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Take Part in the FAA’s Engine Safety Review

On Oct. 24, the FAA will host a one-day Engine & Airframe-Engine Integration Safety Summit. Industry participation is encouraged.

The purpose of the summit is to review and analyze engine-related accidents and incidents from 2014-2018 and examine causes of safety issues. The FAA will also discuss ways to collaborate with industry to detect critical safety threats and identify potential intervention strategies associated with regulations, guidance, and maintenance.

The FAA has organized this summit as part of a larger, ongoing effort to comply with a congressionally mandated “Call to Action” for “Airline Engine Safety Review” as required by the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, H.R. 302 Sec. 309. This review was implemented in response to an April 2018 engine issue on Southwest Flight 1380.

On Jun. 25, the FAA’s Engine & Airframe-Engine Integration Safety Team (EAEI) conducted a stakeholder meeting to review safety trend data analyzed by the Corrective Action Review Board (CARB). The safety analysis was limited to all part 33 engine and part 25 propulsion system items for 2013 to 2018. The EAEI team also considered NTSB accident and FAA safety records from 2013 to 2018. More information about the content of the meeting can be found here.

The FAA invites airframe and engine manufacturers, maintenance providers and other industry leaders to participate in the October summit. ARSA encourages all interested members to attend, but space will be limited and advanced registration is required.

Engine & Airframe-Engine Integration Safety Summit
Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
NTSB Auditorium
420 10th Street, SW, Washington D.C. 20024.

Interested participants should:

(1) Review the summit announcement (click here) for more event information.
(2) Review the Draft Agenda.
(3) Click here to register to reserve your seat and receive more information about the summit.
(4) Submit questions to Tom Stafford, the FAA’s Engine Aircraft Integration Group Lead/Manager, at Thomas.stafford@faa.gov.

While ARSA did not lobby directly on the section of the FAA reauthorization law that produced the engine safety review, the association has been helping the agency to meet the mandated “call to action.” The review all of the work done during the law’s development and see a prioritized listing of sections impacting aviation maintenance, visit arsa.org/faa-reauthorization-2018.

Note: Though ARSA is encouraging industry participation in the summit, the association is not directly involved in administering, sponsoring or supporting the event in any official capacity.



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