ARSA RSS Feed ARSA LinkedIn
Contact Us Online Portal

ARSA to White House: Government Should Trust Its Own Aviation Safety Approvals

On Nov. 17, ARSA submitted a document to the White House identifying an important opportunity for the Department of Defense (DoD) to enhance efficiency and reduce costs related to maintaining its fleet of commercial derivative aircraft (CDA).  The association’s white paper was sent to White House Director of Policy and Interagency Coordination Carlos Diaz-Rosillo as a follow-up to discussions with maintenance industry leaders during the 2017 ARSA Strategic Leadership Conference executive branch briefing.

ARSA’s position is the FAA, through its civil aviation oversight, already determines whether Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA) parts and Designated Engineering Representative (DER) repairs are compliant and fit for use on the aircraft from which CDA are derived. Forcing previously-approved parts and repairs to go through the cumbersome SAR process costs government resources and wastes taxpayers’ money while ignoring the civil aviation sector’s outstanding safety and reliability record. Since SARs are rarely granted, DoD is not benefiting from the cost savings associated with PMA parts and DER repairs.

“By law, DoD has broad authority to make airworthiness determinations in any manner it chooses,” the submission said, citing Title 10 of the U.S. Code and a template from the Defense Logistics Agency. “Unfortunately, this department has translated this authority into an extraordinarily burdensome series of policies and instructions that require aircraft parts manufacturers and maintenance contractors – including those with Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) solutions already approved for use in civil aviation by the FAA – to go through a redundant, expensive, slow and burdensome SAR process to gain DoD approval.”

ARSA recommended the government revise its policies to trust its own aviation safety agency, the FAA. The association urged the White House to work with DoD to recognize “any approval issued by the FAA for a product, material, part, component, process or appliance as eligible for use on a CDA.”

To read the full ARSA submission, click here.

For more information regarding ARSA’s support for its members with military business, contact Executive Vice President Christian A. Klein (christian.klein@arsa.org).



More from ARSA

Study Finds U.S. Companies Serving Global Aviation Customers

The U.S. maintenance sector is increasing its capability to serve the growing, global aviation industry. Seventy-three more FAA-certificated repair stations in the United States are approved by regulators to serve…Read More

Prepare for Anti-Repair Station Legislative Blitz

With much fanfare and famous protagonists present on June 4, aviation maintenance unions and consumer advocate “allies” announced intentions to introduce legislation targeting contract maintenance and raising airline costs. The…Read More

Hotline Highlight – Attention to Detail

The hotline – ARSA’s premier member newsletter – contains news, editorial content, analysis and resources for the aviation maintenance community. All members should ensure they receive their edition the first week of…Read More

Quick Question – Repairman Applications & Employment

In 2018, ARSA helped the U.S. Congress consider the value of repairman certificates. Section 582 of the law reauthorizing the FAA instructed the administrator “assign to the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory…Read More

Act Now

Association members, allies and industry colleagues must support ARSA’s current initiatives to improve aviation policy. Here’s your to-do list for June 2019 (click each page link for more information and…Read More
ARSA