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ARSA Sets the Record Straight for the Future of Aviation Advisory Committee

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA, January 5, 2011 – The Aeronautical Repair Station Association (ARSA) submitted comments for consideration by the Department of Transportation’s Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC). ARSA’s submission was in response to misstatements about contract maintenance made during the Labor and World-class Workforce Subcommittee’s discussions.

“Repair stations are an integral part of the international aviation system,” said ARSA Executive Director Sarah MacLeod. “U.S. and foreign airlines, charter companies, general aviation operators, and aircraft manufacturers around the world depend on maintenance facilities for everything from repairing aircraft to supporting supply chains.”

Contrary to the subcommittee’s assertions, FAA certificated repair stations must adhere to the same standards regardless of location. To operate on U.S. registered aircraft, all facilities must comply with FAA regulations and an FAA certificated provider must perform the work.

In its comments, ARSA reminded the FAAC that it is not possible under current regulations to return an aircraft to service with work done by non-certificated providers. Further, steps to limit the use of appropriately certificated repair stations would be disastrous for the aviation industry and the global economy by destroying an airline’s ability to secure repairs and service in a foreign country.

ARSA also took strong issue with the subcommittee’s recommendation for a uniform set of security standards. A one size fits all approach fails to take into account the industry’s vast diversity and ignores the tight security already self-imposed. The basic nature of the aviation industry demands that safety and security be the top priorities.

“Aviation maintenance provides good-paying jobs for American workers and is guided by the strongest principles of safety and security. While ARSA is disappointed to see the subcommittee rehash common misconceptions about the industry, ARSA hopes that the FAAC recognizes the integral role repair stations play in the international aviation system,” MacLeod said.

To view ARSA’s comments, click here.

Contact:
Jason Langford
Communications Manager
703 739 9543

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ARSA is an Alexandria, Virginia-based trade association that represents aviation maintenance and manufacturing companies. The association has a distinguished 25-year record of advocating for repair stations and providing regulatory compliance assistance to the industry.



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