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August 2013

 
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Table of Contents
Latest News
Sarah Says
ARSA Pushes for Extension or Withdrawal of Continental Motors NPRM
ARSA Requests Interpretation on AMOC Order
IRS Mandates Businesses Inform Employees of Health Coverage
House and Senate THUD Bills Fail to Make Sound before Recess
Filler Highlights BASAs at Asia-Pacific Conference
Bill to Rein in Regulators Clears House
Congressmen Spend Recess Studying at Repair Stations
Lower Your 2013 Tax Bill by Investing in Your Company
50th Anniversary of March on Washington
Aviation and Beyond…
Go Ahead, Give ‘Em Your Digits

Legal Briefs
Looking Back and Forward: Drug and Alcohol Testing

ARSA on the Hill

Regulatory Outlook
FAA Confirms Capability is the Key
FAA Updates Form 8130-3
Which Business Practices are Allowed under Antitrust Law (and Which Aren’t)?
Final Documents/ Your Two Cents

Quality Time
You Mean I Can’t Play Golf?
Deposition – Ten Tips for Being a Good Witness

Membership
Member Spotlight: Red Aviation – Georgetown, Texas
Have You Seen This Person?
A Member Asked…
Check Out ARSA’s Library of Recorded Webinars and Online Training Classes
Take Advantage of ARSA’s Members Getting Members Program, Get 10% Off on Membership Dues
Target Your Message: Advertise in ARSA’s Newsletters and Website!
Exhibit, Sponsor the 2014 Repair Symposium

Positive Publicity

International News
EASA Authorizes FlightSafety Training Courses
International Roundup

Welcome New Members

Regulatory Compliance Training

Upcoming Events


Latest News

Sarah Says: Are You In or Are You Out?

By Sarah MacLeod, ARSA executive director
This month, ARSA Executive Director Sarah MacLeod discusses the complexity of determining who falls “in the pool,” the group of safety-sensitive employees whom the government has decided must be drug and alcohol tested under the Department of Transportation/ Federal Aviation Administration regime. To read MacLeod’s blog, as well as other commentary issued during the month of August, please visit http://blog.arsa.org/.

ARSA Pushes for Extension or Withdrawal of Continental Motors NPRM

On Aug. 30, ARSA and Savvy Aircraft Maintenance Management, Inc. requested the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) submit objective evidence to support its proposed airworthiness directive regarding Continental Motors, Inc. Reciprocating Engines (Docket No. FAA-2012-0002). Further, the groups want the FAA to either extend the comment period by 120 days after the addition of that information to the docket or withdraw the rule until such data can be placed in it. Read more at http://arsa.org/arsa-pushes-for-extension-or-withdrawal-of-continental-motors-nprm/.

ARSA Requests Interpretation on AMOC Order

On Aug. 28, ARSA sent the Federal Aviation Administration a request for a legal interpretation confirming question “f” in the appendix of Order 8110.103A is inaccurate and that it and the answer will either be corrected or removed. Read more at http://arsa.org/arsa-requests-interpretation-on-amoc-order/.

IRS Mandates Businesses Inform Employees of Health Coverage

On Aug. 30, the Internal Revenue Service published a rule in the Federal Register requiring employers to provide all employees (full and part time) with information regarding their health coverage options by Oct. 1, 2013.

Mandated by the Affordable Care Act, the new rule applies to businesses that fall under the Fair Labor Standards Act regardless of whether the employer offers health insurance to any of its employees. Businesses will be required to notify new hires of coverage options within 14 days of their start date.

The Department of Labor created model notices for employers that do offer and do not offer health coverage to employees (click here to visit the DOL information page). Notices must include information about what is provided in the Health Insurance Marketplace, an employee’s eligibility for premium tax credits for certain plans, and that purchasing coverage in the Marketplace may mean forfeiting an employer-sponsored health care plan.

Stay tuned to ARSA for more information about Affordable Care Act rules.

House and Senate THUD Bills Fail to Make Sound before Recess

In what epitomized the contentious nature of the past eight months, lawmakers left town with both chambers failing to complete work on the Transportation, Housing, & Urban Development (THUD) appropriation bills (S. 1243; H.R. 2610) as interparty squabbles and partisan bickering got in the way of compromise and legislating. Read more at http://arsa.org/house-and-senate-thud-bills-fail-to-make-sound-before-recess/.

Filler Highlights BASAs at Asia-Pacific Conference

At an Aug. 13 FAA Asia-Pacific Flight Standards Meeting, ARSA Managing Director and General Counsel Marshall S. Filler, as part of a panel on maintenance repair organization oversight, spoke about the value of bilateral aviation safety agreements (BASAs). Read more at http://arsa.org/filler-highlights-basas-at-asia-pacific-conference/.

Bill to Rein in Regulators Clears House

On Aug. 2, the House passed legislation that requires new rules with an economic impact of more than $100 million to undergo review and approval by the House and Senate before taking effect.

The Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act (H.R. 367) also mandates that if Congress doesn’t sign off on a “major” rule in 70 legislative days, it cannot be implemented.

According to House Small Business Committee Chairman Sam Graves (R-Mo.), major rules published in the past four years have added nearly $70 billion in new regulatory costs. The bill’s supporters hope the REINS Act would thwart other major regulatory actions, such as rules born out of the Affordable Care Act and Dodd-Frank.

Facing a veto threat from the White House, the REINS Act will likely encounter the same fate as a similar bill that passed the House in December 2011, which never made it to the Senate floor. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) has introduced the REINS Act (S. 15) in the Senate.

Congressmen Spend Recess Studying at Repair Stations

With lawmakers home for the month-long August recess, repair stations across the country stepped up to ARSA’s challenge to educate their representatives about the aviation maintenance industry. Read more at http://arsa.org/congressmen-spend-recess-studying-at-repair-stations/.

Lower Your 2013 Tax Bill by Investing in Your Company

ARSA Executive Vice President Christian A. Klein writes about how time is running out for your company to cut its 2013 tax bill by making new capital investments. Read more at http://blog.arsa.org/?p=260.

50th Anniversary of March on Washington

ARSA Vice President of Communications, Policy, & Planning Eric Byer discusses why the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream means so much to ARSA. Read more at http://blog.arsa.org/?p=262.

Aviation and Beyond…

ARSA Vice President of Legislative Affairs Daniel Fisher writes about tax reform and other issues ARSA is engaged on that could impact the cost of doing business. Read more at http://blog.arsa.org/?p=253.

Go Ahead, Give ‘Em Your Digits

ARSA Communications Manager Josh Pudnos writes about how providing state MRO economic and jobs data to the media and lawmakers provides context for an industry that is not always the easiest for the public to understand. Read more at http://blog.arsa.org/?p=258.

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Legal Briefs

Looking Back and Forward: Drug and Alcohol Testing

Adding to the regulatory issue page “library,” this month we look at some history surrounding the repair station antidrug & alcohol (D&A) testing rules, what ARSA did to combat the original rulemaking, and what the association does to assist its members with compliance. This article and further information is available at http://arsa.org/regulatory/faa/operations/drug-and-alcohol-testing/.

On Jan. 10, 2006, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a final rule “to clarify” D&A testing regulations; henceforth “…each person who performs a safety-sensitive function for a regulated employer by contract, including by subcontract at any tier, [will be] subject to testing” (emphasis added).

ARSA promptly challenged the mandate; in a July 17, 2007 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit agreed the FAA violated the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) by not properly considering the rule’s impact on small businesses (ARSA, et. Al. v. FAA, 494 F. 3d 161).

The RFA (5 U.S.C. § 603 (a)), passed by Congress in 1980, addresses the disproportionate economic impact of federal regulations on small businesses. The law does not require special treatment or regulatory exemptions for small businesses, but mandates that agencies look at different ways to achieve public policy objectives without unduly burdening those enterprises.

In its D&A rulemaking, the FAA argued the new rule would only affect 297 repair station subcontractors. In response, ARSA conducted a member survey and its own economic analysis and estimated the number of subcontractors affected at more than 12,000. The discrepancy caused the Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy to weigh in; it also concluded the FAA’s analysis was flawed.

The Court ultimately upheld the D&A testing requirements but directed the FAA to conduct the proper RFA analysis. For more than three years, the FAA failed to make any effort to comply with the court’s ruling. On Feb. 17, 2011, ARSA filed a petition for a writ of mandamus to force the FAA into compliance and on March 1, 2011, the court sided with ARSA, giving the FAA until March 10 to perform the final regulatory flexibility analysis.

On March 8, 2011, the FAA published a supplemental regulatory flexibility determination (SRFD) in the Federal Register, which the court accepted in its April 13, 2011 order. While the association submitted comments challenging the FAA’s SRFD conclusion (arguing the FAA failed to use reliable and independently verifiable data as required by the RFA and the Data Quality Act), the FAA published its final regulatory flexibility determination on July 12, 2011.

ARSA continues to assist its members in complying with the D&A rules. Additionally, the association has partnered with NATA Compliance Services (NATACS) to provide antidrug and alcohol program management services for accurate, fast and reliable solutions. NATACS is a “one stop” solution that provides policy templates, plan setup, regulatory assistance, and program administration. Learn more at the Sept. 18, 2013 Drug & Alcohol Program Webinar.

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ARSA on the Hill

By Daniel Fisher, ARSA vice president of legislative affairs

In August, ARSA continued to work behind the scenes with the aviation maintenance industry’s strongest Capitol Hill allies to introduce legislation to lift the ban on FAA foreign repair station certifications. It takes a combination of the association’s legislative team educating Congress and hearing from constituents about the issue to get a bill introduced.

The legislative team coordinated several lawmaker visits to ARSA member facilities during the August congressional recess. On Aug. 22, Rep. David Joyce (R-Ohio) visited Component Repair Technologies in Mentor, OH. On August 28, two ARSA members played host. In the morning, senior staffers from Rep. Frederica Wilson’s (D-Fla.) toured Aircraft Electric Motors in Miami Lakes, Fla. Later in the day, Red Aviation in Georgetown, Texas, visited with Rep. John Carter (R-Texas). Facility visits are the best way to educate policymakers (both lawmakers and staffers) about the industry and your business while raising your company’s visibility.

Before the August recess, ARSA PAC delivered campaign support to Congressman John Mica (R-Fla.). Mica, a senior member of the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee, has been a strong advocate for the aviation maintenance industry and was a past recipient of ARSA’s Legislative Leadership Award.

To ensure lawmakers like Rep. Mica return to Capitol Hill, ARSA PAC is continuing to push for more support. This year, 20 members have given $7,095 to the PAC. To learn more visit http://arsa.org/legislative/about-arsa-pac/.

Regulatory Outlook


FAA Confirms Capability is the Key

On July 29, 2013, the Federal Aviation Administration responded to an ARSA request that the agency confirm part-specific training is not required for work performed under a repair station certificate. Read more at http://arsa.org/faa-confirms-capability-is-the-key/.

FAA Updates Form 8130-3

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently announced a revised FAA Form 8130-3, used for domestic airworthiness approval of new products and articles; approval for return to service of altered aircraft parts; and export airworthiness approvals of aircraft engines, propellers, or articles. The FAA revised the form as part of harmonization efforts with other civil aviation authorities to ease the identification and traceability of goods between the United States and other countries. Read more at http://arsa.org/faa-updates-form-8130-3/.

Which Business Practices are Allowed under Antitrust Law (and Which Aren’t)?

Understanding the basics of anti-trust law is essential to anyone in the business world who interacts with competitors. Although these laws were born out of the late 18th Century, 2012 was a record year for antitrust fines and crossing that line may be all too easy for anyone trying to improve the bottom line for their company. Read more at http://arsa.org/which-business-practices-are-allowed-under-antitrust-law-and-which-arent/.

Final Documents/Your Two Cents

This list includes Federal Register publications, such as final rules, Advisory Circulars, and policy statements, as well as proposed rules and policies of interest to ARSA members. Read more at http://arsa.org/final-documents-your-two-cents/.

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Quality Time

Editor’s note: The views and opinions expressed by contributing authors do not necessarily state or reflect those of ARSA, and shall not be used for endorsement purposes.

You Mean I Can’t Play Golf?

By Jonathan w. Yarborough,Constangy, Brooks & Smith, LLC, 80 Peachtree Rd., Ste. 208, Asheville, NC 28803-3160. © 2013 Jonathan W. Yarborough ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

When a decision to terminate an employee for the misuse of Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is based on an honest belief the individual abused his/her leave, a company does not violate the FMLA.

Under that law, a company with fifty or more employees must provide up to twelve (12) weeks of unpaid leave. Employees must have worked for the company twelve (12) months and have logged at least one thousand fifty (1250) hours. An employee may qualify if s/he has a “serious health condition” or requires leave to care for a family member and theleave can be taken intermittently.

A recent court case involved an employee who asked for and was granted FMLA leave to care for an ailing father. The employer began to see a pattern to the leave requests; the employee seemingly asked for FMLA leave when there was no personal leave remaining. The employee’s record showed nine warnings, one suspension for attendance problems and a final written warning for dishonesty involving a safety violation.

After the employee once again requested FMLA leave to take the father to the doctor, the supervisor, having just denied this individual’s request for time off for another purpose, brought the employer’s suspicions to a human resources official. Human resources called the father’s doctor to confirm the appointment and discovered one had not been made. The doctor’s office also informed human resources it had been instructed not to provide past appointment dates to the employer. Later that day, however, the doctor’s office called and confirmed the appointment.

The employer subsequently conducted an investigation. Two co-workers stated in an interview that the employee had not misused the FMLA leave. However, two others submitted statements that the employee had used FMLA leave to play golf, spend time with significant other, and have breakfast with friends. The employee did admit to using FMLA leave to attend a country music festival.

When fired however, the employee filed a lawsuit claiming the employer had either interfered with the employee’s legitimate use of FMLA leave or retaliated for taking leave. The employee challenged the truthfulness of the reports the employer had obtained during the investigation.

The court dismissed the case, agreeing with the company’s decision to terminate the employee. This case is important for raising credibility issues: the doctor’s office did eventually confirm an appointment had been made and two co-workers who were interviewed stated the employee had not misused his leave.

In the language of the court, “Even if an employee claims that the investigation into the alleged misconduct was deficient, as long as the employer had an honest suspicion that misuse had occurred–even if that basis is ultimately incorrect and even if the employer ‘could have conducted a more thorough investigation’–the employer does not violate the FMLA.” The court considered the following factors enough to conclude the employer had an honest belief the employee was, indeed, misusing FMLA:

  • evidence of the employee’s past attendance problems;
  • the warning for dishonesty;
  • suspicious timing of requests for leave;
  • an initial call to the doctor’s office; and
  • the fact the doctor’s office was instructed not to provide appointment information.

The bottom line is that this company did not violate the FMLA when terminating an employee for the misuse of FMLA based on the honest belief the individual abused the leave–even though it was later determined the investigation was deficient or flawed.

Deposition – Ten Tips for Being a Good Witness

By Steven E. Pazar, Attorney at Law, 11 Carriage House Lane, Boxford, Massachusetts 01921. © 2013 Steven E. Pazar ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Steven is a counselor to businesses operating in high-risk industries, including aviation. He provides templates, tools, and training to improve contracting efficiency, close deals faster, and control costs.

Being deposed in a legal proceeding is a modern day rite of passage. Sooner or later you will likely be called to testify under oath on behalf of your business or as a third-party witness. Experienced litigators often say: “You can’t win a case at a deposition, but you can lose one.” To avoid a bad result under oath, you must prepare.

Here are some simple tips for being a good witness:

 1. Tell the truth. You are under oath and must tell the truth. A lie may constitute perjury. Don’t exaggerate. Your truthfulness reflects directly on your credibility.

 2. Don’t qualify favorable facts. Be definitive; don’t using qualifiers such as: I think; I might have; it seems; I assume; possibly, or correct me if I am wrong, etc. Qualified answers are viewed as weak answers. It is acceptable to indicate certain assumptions must be made to answer a particular question or that a question poses an unrealistic hypothetical.

3. Never guess. If you are not sure of the answer to a question, do not guess. If you don’t know the answer, just say so. It is fine to say “I don’t remember” if that is a truthful answer. If you do not understand a question just say so until it is clear to you.

4. Don’t volunteer information. You are a witness not an educator. If the counsel asking questions does not have a good grasp of the case or the issues, it is not your job to fill in the gaps. Just answer the questions asked. You are not obligated to “help” direct the testimony. Similarly, don’t be lured into offering additional information if there is a time gap between your completed answer and the next question.

5. Don’t apologize. You have nothing to apologize for if you don’t understand or have the answer to a question – it is not your fault. You can only testify as to your knowledge and recollections. Resist the natural tendency to clarify counsel’s apparent confusion.

6. Take your time. Listen carefully to the whole question and consider your response before answering. The length of time you take to consider a particular question will not be reflected on the transcript. Finish your answers but don’t ramble. Take care to avoid providing a confusing response if interrupted during an answer.

7. Listen to objections. Stop and listen to your counsel if s/he objects to a question. This may be followed by specific instructions from your counsel either to answer a particular question or not. Be consistent even when asked the same or similar questions in several different ways in an attempt to obtain conflicting or more favorable answers.

8. Stay calm. Resist attempts to make you angry or excited. Avoid being drawn into an argument – keep your answers short and simple. You are at a deposition not a debate.

9. No jokes. Testimony under oath is not the time for jokes, sarcastic remarks, or flippant answers. Be professional, speak clearly, and avoid non-verbal responses. Don’t engage in any idle chitchat with attendees before, during, or after the deposition. Put on your “game face” and don’t let an opponent’s friendly demeanor drop your guard.

10. Get a good night’s sleep. A deposition is hard work. Be well rested so you can stay sharp for the duration.

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Membership


Member Spotlight: Red Aviation – Georgetown, Texas

Red Aviation began as Challenger Spares & Support in 2001 providing airframe parts specifically for the Challenger Series of aircraft. Throughout the years, the product line and repair services have expanded to support the Global, Learjet, Falcon, and Gulfstream aircraft. The company’s customer base has also grown from working directly with operators and service centers to doing business with brokers, aviation management firms, insurers, and FBOs.

After extending several divisions and capabilities, Challenger Spares & Support rebranded to Red Aviation in 2012.

Red Aviation has quickly become an active member of ARSA, inviting Rep. John Carter (R-Texas) for a facility visit in August.

For more information, visit http://www.redaviation.aero.

Are you an ARSA member who would like to be in the “Member Spotlight?” If so, please contact Josh Pudnos at Josh.Pudnos@arsa.org.

Have You Seen This Person?

Each month, the hotline spotlights key regulatory, legislative, and business leaders making important contributions to the aviation industry. This month we look at Rep. Frank LoBiondo, R-N.J., chairman of the House Transportation & Infrastructure (T&I) Subcommittee on Aviation.

Rep. Frank LoBiondo, chairman of the T&I Subcommittee on Aviation

Rep. LoBiondo is currently serving his tenth term in the U.S. House of Representatives. He is a member of the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee, where he sits on the Coast Guard & Maritime Transportation and Highways & Transit Subcommittees. He is also the chairman of the Aviation Subcommittee.

Additionally, LoBiondo serves on the House Armed Services Committee and is a champion for New Jersey’s bases and service personnel, especially on issues of military pay and benefits. LoBiondo was also appointed in the 112th Congress to sit on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

Before Congress, LoBiondo was elected to the New Jersey General Assembly and worked in the state capitol from 1988-1994. Prior to that, he served on the Cumberland County Board of Chosen Freeholders.

LoBiondo earned a Bachelor of Arts in business administration from Saint Joseph’s University and worked for a family-owned trucking company for 26 years.

A Member Asked…

Q: The FAA aviation safety inspector (ASI) assigned to our company is difficult to work with; is there a process that allows repair stations to request a replacement?

A: Removing an ASI takes a lot of persistence and documentation. In the alternative, ARSA suggests that the company take a more professional approach with the ASI, to include—

1. Ensuring understanding of the politics of aviation safety. Have regular meetings with government officials to set a professional tone and introduce the company and its people when “things are good” instead of only communicating on issues that are “bad.”

2. Documenting every single communication with the government. Follow up with every single visit or important oral communication in writing within 36 hours. Ensure the communication includes the meeting date and time, person(s) present by name and title, and a summary of all facts presented, issues discussed and action items assigned.

3. Keeping communications factual in nature. Do not include subjective information or accusations; indeed, try not to use the word “you” to describe the actions of the FAA inspector.

For information and resources, visit our Dealing with the Government issue page.

Check Out ARSA’s Library of Recorded Webinars and Online Training Classes

ARSA is pleased to announce that recorded online training classes and webinars are now available for member purchase. Check back often as courses will be continually added. Read more at http://arsa.org/training-2/online-training/.

Take Advantage of ARSA’s Members Getting Members Program, Get 10% Off on Membership Dues

The best form of advertising is word of mouth. Use the Members Getting Members Toolkit to recruit an ARSA member and your company will receive a discounted membership rate for your next membership term. Get more information at http://arsa.org/membership/members-getting-members/

Target Your Message: Advertise Today in ARSA’s Newsletters and Website!

ARSA recently updated its menu of advertising opportunities for arsa.org, the hotline and the ARSA Dispatch. Take advantage of these great opportunities today to showcase your company, a new product or event. For more information go to http://arsa.org/advertise/

Exhibit, Sponsor the 2014 Repair Symposium

As the maintenance industry’s top event devoted exclusively to regulatory compliance, the ARSA Symposium attracts a highly qualified professional audience. Use this opportunity to promote your company while showing support for ARSA. Get more information at http://arsa.org/news-media/events/arsa-symposium/arsa-annual-repair-symposium-sponsorship/

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Positive Publicity

As part of ARSA’s ongoing Positive Publicity Campaign (PPC), the association is actively working to enhance the media’s understanding of our $65 billion industry and its vital importance to global civil aviation. To accomplish this goal, ARSA monitors media coverage on aviation maintenance to spread the word about the valuable role repair stations provide their communities in jobs, economic opportunities, and community involvement. These are some of this month’s top stories highlighting the industry’s contributions.

International News


EASA Authorizes FlightSafety Training Courses

On Aug. 6, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) approved more than 140 aviation maintenance courses offered by FlightSafety International. The agency signed off on the programs following a detailed review and evaluation of the company’s existing offerings in accordance with the EASA Training Needs Analysis regulation 1149/2011.

Classes range from two to 25 days in duration and are aligned to the latest standards set by EASA as well as the Civil Aviation Authority of Australia, the Civil Aviation Administration of China, and Transport Canada. Course topics include maintenance, avionics, and transitioning from one airframe category to another.

The training sessions are available for technicians who support and maintain Pratt & Whitney Canada engines and aircraft manufactured by Beechcraft, Bombardier, Cessna, Dassault Falcon, Gulfstream, Hawker, and Sikorsky.

International Roundup

To provide more international coverage, ARSA presents a monthly roundup of world events pertaining to the industry

Airbus and S7 Engineering to Develop Strategic A320 Maintenance Training Partnership in Russia (AviTrader)

Mattala Airport to Become A Repair Shop (The Sunday Leader)

Sri Lanka Plans Aircraft Repair Hub with Lufthansa (Gulf News)

EgyptAir Training Center Announces Specialized Maintenance Training (Arabian Aerospace)

Vector Aerospace to Establish Permanent Facility in Brazil (AIN Online)

AgustaWestland to Expand Facilities in Brazil (AviTrader)

Lufthansa Bombardier Aviation Services Opens Another Hangar (AviTrader)

Turkish Technic Gains Indian MRO Approval (Flight Global)

Welcome New Members

Regulatory Compliance Training

Test your knowledge on §145.55 Duration and Renewal of Certificate.

Upcoming Events

InfoShare – Sept. 17-19, 2013

MRO Europe 2013 – Sept. 24-26, 2013

MRO Network: Airline E&M North America – Oct. 15-17, 2013

NBAA Annual Meeting and Convention – Oct. 20-26, 2013

MARPA Annual Conferences – Oct. 23-25, 2013

MRO Asia – Oct. 29-31, 2013

International Aviation Forecast Conference – Nov. 3-5, 2013

SpeedNews 18th Annual Regional & Business Aviation Industry Suppliers Conference – Nov. 6-8, 2013

International PMA Summit – Nov. 8-9, 2013

AVM Summit, USA – November 21-22, 2013 – Nov. 21-22, 2013

ARSA Annual Repair Symposium and Legislative Fly-In – March 19-21, 2014

Previous 12 issues:

2013: Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July
 
2012: Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

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the hotline is the monthly publication of the Aeronautical Repair Station Association (ARSA), the not-for-profit international trade association for certificated repair stations. It is for the exclusive use of ARSA members and federal employees on the ARSA mailing list. For a membership application, please call 703.739.9543 or visit http://arsa.org/membership/join/

This material is provided for educational and informational purposes only. It does not constitute legal, consulting, tax or any other type of professional advice.

Law, regulations, guidance and government policies change frequently. While ARSA updates this material, we do not guarantee its accuracy. In addition, the application of this material to a particular situation is always dependent on the facts and circumstances involved. The use of this material is therefore at your own risk.

All content in the hotline, except where indicated otherwise, is the property of ARSA. This content may not be reproduced, distributed or displayed, nor may derivatives or presentations be created from it in whole or in part, in any manner without the prior written consent of ARSA.

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ARSA reserves all remaining rights and will use any means necessary to protect its intellectual property.

© 2013 Aeronautical Repair Station Association

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